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California Mid-Century Modern Domes

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geodesic dome
Glendale, CA
geodesic dome
Three Rivers, CA
geodesic dome
Isla Vista, CA
This geodesic dome in Glendale previously housed Star Brite Cleaners and was painted teal. It may have housed a photo shop and gardening supply place as well. It's not clear what it is being used for now. I believe it was built around 1977. [map]

This geodesic dome in Three Rivers houses the Heart's Desire gift shop. This one appears to be from the 1960s or 1970s. [map]

This spherical geodesic dome in Isla Vista was built in 1972. For more, see this website. [map]

geodesic dome
Santa Rosa, CA
Kerman Inn
Kerman, CA
Curl Up & Dye
Brawley, CA
This geodesic dome might be in use by the business next door, Sunshine Pool & Spa. [map]

The Kerman Inn geodesic dome serves as the motel's office. [map]

The Curl Up & Dye building has a concrete-looking dome roof. I don't know how old this building is or what business it housed originally. It may have been a residence. [map]

The Domes
Davis, CA
The Domes, aka Baggins End Innovative Housing, is a housing community for UC Davis students. The 14 fiberglass domes were installed in 1972. They were constructed with the help of student volunteers. For more, see this website. [map]

Foxworthy KinderCare
San Jose, CA
Foxworthy KinderCare has a semi-circle of six domes surrounding a hexagonal building. These buildings were probably built in the 1960s. [map]

Ky's Hair Designs
Eureka, CA
The double-dome structure which now houses Ky's Hair Designs was built in the 1970s. I don't know the original occupant. In 1979, it housed Ming Tree Realty. In the 1980s and 1990s, it housed the Video Connections video store. There are other identical domes scattered around the country including these in Marathon, FL. [map]

Integratron
Landers, CA
The Dome
Bakersfield, CA
The Integratron was built by George Van Tassel from 1954-1959. He continued to tinker with the building until his death in 1978. The design was meant to rejuvenate human cells. The building is now operated as a tourist attraction. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

The Dome opened in 1941 as the Strelich Stadium, a sports arena. The dome is 106 feet in diameter. Today, it is used for live performances, sporting events, private parties and other activities. [map]

Bubble House
Pasadena, CA
This Bubble House was designed by Wallace Neff as an experiment in affordable housing. It was built in 1946. Neff built many of them all over the world but this is the sole survivor. Also known as the Shell House, it was built with gunite, rebar and concrete. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, and 4. [map]

Neighborhood Church of Chico
Chico, CA
The Neighborhood Church of Chico was built in the early 1970s. [map]

Palomar College Dome
San Marcos, CA
The Palomar College Dome was built in 1958. There are 575 diamond-shaped panels. The building is used for athletic competitions, PE classes, and other events. For more, see this website. [map]

More California Mid-Century Modern Domes:
Cinerama Dome (Los Angeles)