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New York Mid-Century Modern (page 1)

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Guggenheim Bandshell
Lincoln Center
New York, NY
Vivian Beaumont Theater
Lincoln Center
New York, NY
The Guggenheim Bandshell was built in 1969 as part of Lincoln Center in Damrosch Park. The structure is made of concrete. Visible in the photo just next to the Bandshell is the Metropolitan Opera House completed in 1966. For more, see this website.

The Vivian Beaumont Theater was designed by Eero Saarinen and built in 1965. There are other 1960s buildings at Lincoln Center including Alice Tully Hall from 1969 by Pietro Belluschi. For more, see this website.

former Joseph Curran Building
New York, NY
The Joseph Curran Building was designed by Albert Ledner and completed in 1964. It was originally built as the headquarters for the National Maritime Union. It was later known as the O'Toole Building and had been threatened with demolition for years. These photos are from 2009. In 2014, the building was saved and now houses the Lenox Hill Healthplex. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, and 3.

Guggenheim Museum
New York, NY
The Guggenheim Museum was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built from 1956-1959. As the exterior suggests, the interior features the unique spiral ramp exhibition space inside. It was intended to resemble the interior of a nautilus shell. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2.

Whitney Museum
New York, NY
The Whitney Museum was designed by Marcel Breuer and built in 1966. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, and 3.

TWA Terminal 5
JFK Airport
Brooklyn, NY
Control Tower
LaGuardia Airport
Queens, NY
TWA Terminal 5 was designed by Eero Saarinen and completed in 1962. It closed in 2001 and was threatened with demolition. When this photo was taken in 2005, the building was being restored for Jet Blue Airways. In 2013, it was announced that the building would be converted into a hotel and conference center. However, in 2014, those plans fell apart. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, and 4.

The LaGuardia Control Tower (aka Building 88) is 150 foot tall and was built in 1964. Its porthole windows remind me of the Wonder Bread design.

New York State Pavilion
Flushing, NY
shelter structures
Flushing Marina, NY
The New York State Pavilion was created for the 1964-1965 World's Fair. The steel and concrete structure was designed by Philip Johnson. It features three observations towers which are 90 feet, 185 feet, and 250 feet tall. These towers were reached by capsule-shaped elevators which are still visible. After being abandoned for decades, there is hope that the Pavilion can be restored. The Tent of Tomorrow, which is part of the Pavilion, features sixteen 100 foot tall towers that once supported a canopy. On the ground underneath the structure is a huge map of New York State made of terrazzo panels. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

These two shelter structures were built as pavilions for the 1964-1965 World's Fair Marina. They were part of the US Coast Guard's Exhibition Hall and were originally enclosed by glass walls. They were designed by Peter Schladermundt. The third pavilion is now used as a cabin in the Adirondacks. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Lassie Coats
Long Island City, NY
The Lassie Coats building was constructed in 1958. It now houses the Structural Display Co. For more, see this website.

More NYC Mid-Century Modern Buildings:

Pan American Worldport Terminal: 1, 2 (Brooklyn) [gone]
Madison Square Garden: 1, 2 (New York)
United Nations: 1, 2 (New York)

Touch of Italy
Tonawanda, NY
The round Touch of Italy restaurant appears to be mid-century. I believe Touch of Italy has been here since 1984. Does anyone know what this place was originally and when it was built?

European Health Spa
Scarsdale, NY
This mushroom-shaped Jack LaLanne's European Health Spa was designed by Don Parry and built in 1969. There was a restaurant, gym and lounge inside. The business has been closed for many years. I don't know if there were other round buildings in the chain. Three abstract shapes and a statue of Atlas are installed in front of the building. Parts of Atlas' globe are scattered at the statue's base. Office plants or outdoor plants have taken over the building's interior. There was talk of demolishing it in 2001, however, as of 2010, it still remains. Many former Jack LaLanne's locations are now used by other health clubs but have kept their Atlas statues such as this one in Reno, NV. For more, see this website.