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Texas Art Deco Gas Stations

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former Conoco station
Shamrock, TX
This former Conoco station was built in 1936. The U Drop Inn Cafe was housed in the building from the beginning. The building is faced with glazed ceramic tile and trimmed with neon lighting. In the 1970s, it became a FINA station and the building was painted red, white and blue. In the early 1980s, the building was repainted in the original beige and green. It remained a FINA station. The gas station and cafe closed in the 1990s. From 2000-2003, the building was restored for the Shamrock Chamber of Commerce which uses it as an office and visitors' center. The cafe is only open for special events. This modern ATM machine across the street was built to resemble the Conoco station. in 2013, it was announced that the neon installed on the gas station would be replaced with LED tubing. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. [map]

former Good Luck Gas Station
Dallas, TX
This former Good Luck Gas Station was built in 1939. Its 35 foot tall tower was once outlined with red neon. There were also letters around the canopy outlined with neon. The Good Luck Oil Company, which was founded in 1931, also went by the GLOCO name. There were more than 50 stations in the Dallas area at one time. There may be a couple modern stations still in operation today. Only three GLOCO stations were built in this Art Deco style. The other two were demolished, one in 1970 and the other in 1982.

This station closed in the late 1970s. It remained vacant until it was torched by arsonists in 1992. The station was then restored and turned into office space. The front part of this structure which was a canopy is now an enclosed space. The rounded office window is now partially concealed behind an addition. The arched doorway which was once a service bay appears to be used as a garage. I believe this neon sign is the original. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, and 3. [map]

former Sinclair station [gone]
San Antonio, TX
This former double-canopied Sinclair station was built in 1948. There was once a dinosaur on top of the rooftop ball. Later, this building served as a Texaco and Conoco station. Gus Mann Automotive, a repair shop, took over the building in 1962 and removed the gas tanks and pumps. In 2016, the building was demolished and a new Starbucks was built. The rooftop ball was either saved or reconstructed and installed on a little tribute structure.

former station
San Antonio, TX
This former station has some subtle Art Deco details. It's possible they might have been from a remodeling. This building housed a Texaco until just a few years ago. When these photos were taken in 2011, the building was vacant. By 2016, the building had been painted brown and was housing Ideal Shoes. [map]

former station
San Antonio, TX
This former station now houses Gomez Tire Shop. These photos are from 2011. By 2016, the building had been painted pink and blue. [map]

former station
San Antonio, TX
This former station appears to be the same design as the station shown immediately above. It now houses the Leandro Renaud Law Offices. [map]

former station
Fort Worth, TX
This former station was built around 1929. Although there is a replica Texaco pump, I don't know what brand was sold here originally. The patterning on the columns makes me suspect it was built as a Gulf. Before being restored in 2009, the building housed Buck's Auto Trim. This photo was taken in 2011. By 2014, the building was housing a Metro PCS store. [map]

Texas
Canopies
Texas
Iceboxes
Texas
Conoco
Texas
Humble Oil
Texas
Magnolia
Texas
Phillips 66
Texas
Sinclair
Texas
Misc.

Gas Stations Main Page

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Tips & Updates. If you have suggestions about places that I haven't covered, historical info, or updates about places/things that have been remodeled or removed, I'd love to hear from you: roadarch@outlook.com.