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Giant Hot Dog Statues (page 1)

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Henry's Drive-in
Cicero, IL
Henry's Drive-in opened here in 1950. This hot dog sign was built in 1960. Just down the street from Henry's, there was another restaurant known as Bunyon's [sic] that had a Giant Man holding a hot dog. Bunyon's closed and the statue was moved to Atlanta, IL in 2003. For more, see this website. [map]

Fast Track
Chicago, IL
Pal's Sudden Service
Elizabethton, TN
Pal's Sudden Service
Bristol, TN
Fast Track features this giant hot dog sign. It may have been inspired by the Henry's Drive-in hot dog (described above) which is not that far away. For more, see this website. [map]

Pal's Sudden Service was founded in 1956 by Fred "Pal" Barger with a drive-in in Kingsport, TN. The company now has 18 locations in Virginia and Tennessee. In 1984, this drive-thru-only building was designed. The original napkin sketch included this stair-stepped front with the giant burger, hot dog, fries and drink. The first of these buildings opened in 1985 in Kingsport, TN and there are more than 15 of them now. For more about Pal's, see this website. [Elizabethton map]; [Bristol map]

Tail O' the Pup
Hollywood, CA (now North Hollywood, CA)
The Tail O' the Pup is a 17 foot long hot dog stand. It was designed by architect Milton J. Black in 1938 and built in 1945. It was nearly destroyed in 1985 before it was saved and moved one block east. The original location had chrome bar stools in front. In 2005, the restaurant closed and the giant hot dog was put in storage. In 2014, the structure was moved to Las Vegas where there were plans to restore it. At that time, the intent was to return the structure to the Los Angeles area where it would be used as a hot dog stand again. Finally, in 2017, it was donated to the Valley Relics Museum in Burbank, CA. It was moved to the museum's storage lot in North Hollywood for now. These photos were taken there. In 2018, it was announced that new owners will be restoring the building and reopening it as a restaurant somewhere in Los Angeles. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, and 4.

This hot dog stand at Canobie Lake Amusement Park in Salem, NH was inspired by the Tail O' the Pup.

Top Dog
Portland, CT
The Top Dog hot dog stand is a converted 16 foot long Airstream trailer. In 1981, when Andrea Spaulding fantasized about opening a restaurant, her husband bought this trailer and transformed it for her. Al also restored the 1972 Checker Cab which sits next to the trailer and tows it to state fairs and such. Although the giant weenie is topped with relish and onions, Andrea is famous for her two types of meat toppings. This photo is from 2003. By 2013, the hot dog had been repainted. For more, see this website. [map]

Wienermobile
San Jose, CA
The first Oscar Mayer Wienermobile was built in 1936. The one shown here is one of the six modern models which was parked temporarily at a supermarket. For more, see this website.

Van Hanson's Meat Market
Shakopee, MN
The Van Hanson's Meat Market giant hot dog was built on a VW chassis. It was apparently inspired by the Wienermobile. This was being repaired at a gas station when I took this photo in 2011. It was not there or in front of the store in 2018. Does anyone know where it's located now?

Giant Hot Dog
Hatch, NM
2012: 2017:
This Giant Hot Dog was installed on poles next to Franciscan RV in 2012. It advertised for Sparky's Restaurant which is located just a few blocks away. Both businesses are owned by Teaku Nunn who has many other fiberglass statues on display in town. By 2015, the Hot Dog had been moved to the nearby former Dairy Queen building and installed on the ground. It was advertising for Dragon City Fireworks which occupied the building at that time. In 2017, the building appeared to be vacant. However, the hot dog and Tyrannosaurus Rex were still there. [map]

Coney Island Dairyland
Aspen Park, CO

2004:

Coney Island Boardwalk
Bailey, CO

2012:

The Coney Island Dairyland hot dog shaped building is 42 foot long, 15 foot tall. It is made of concrete and steel and weighs 14 tons. It seats ten people at the stools inside. The stand opened originally in Denver, CO in 1966 as the "Boardwalk at Coney Island". The design was patented that same year with plans to open another 15 stands like it in Denver. However, I believe this was the only one that was built. This stand closed in 1968 and was moved to a mobile home park for a couple of years. It was then moved to Aspen Park, CO where it reopened in 1970 as the Coney Island Dairyland.

Around 2005, the land on which it stood was sold with plans to build a bank. In 2006, the building was moved to Bailey, CO where it was restored. In 2007, it reopened as the Coney Island Boardwalk. In 2015, the building and property were put up for sale for $1,495,000. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

Between the Buns [gone]
Orlando, FL
The Between the Buns hot dog stand was located at a Chevron gas station when these photos were taken in 2009. I believe it opened in 2005. The trailer transformation was done in Boston, MA. In 2010, the stand was put up for sale when the owner announced he was moving to Boston. I don't know where the stand went or if it has reopened somewhere.

Giant Hot Dogs
(page 2)
Giant Food Main Page

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