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Louisiana Movie Theatres (page 2)

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Saenger Theatre
New Orleans, LA

2010:

2019:
The Saenger Theatre was designed by Emile Weil and built in 1927. It was restored in the late 1970s and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The theatre closed after damage from Hurricane Katrina in 2005. After restoration, the theatre reopened in 2013. This round marquee was replaced with replicas of the original blade and box sign. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

Ashton Theatre
New Orleans, LA
Gem Theatre
New Orleans, LA
former Algy Theatre
New Orleans, LA
The Ashton Theatre opened in 1927 and closed in 1958. It is now used as an artist's studio. For more, see this website. [map]

The Gem Theatre was designed by Dreyfous and Seiferth in 1948. The theatre opened in 1951. It closed in 1960. In 2016, the sign was recreated and the building was restored for use by the Wayward Owl Brewing Company. The brew pub closed in 2018 and the building is vacant again. This photo is from 2019. For more, see this website. [map]

The Algy Theatre was built in 1940 and closed in 1961. It now houses the Rosetree Blown Glass Studio. For more, see this website. [map]

State Theatre
New Orleans, LA
Carver Theatre
New Orleans, LA
The State Theatre was designed by Thomas W. Lamb and built in 1926. In the late 1980s, the theatre was renamed the State Palace Theatre. It closed in 2005 after damage from Hurricane Katrina but later reopened and became a concert venue. It closed in 2007. In 2018, there were plans to reuse the building for a hotel and preserve the marquee and possibly some of the interior. For more, see this website. [map]

The Carver Theatre was named after George Washington Carver. It was designed by Jack Corgan and opened in 1950. It closed around 1980 and used as a health clinic until it was flooded by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The building was restored and reopened as a live performance venue in 2014. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

Joy Theatre
New Orleans, LA
2010: 2019:
The Joy Theatre opened in 1947. It was named after the owner, Joy Houck Sr. The building has the same style blade sign as his earlier Joy Theatre in Rayville shown below. This New Orleans theatre closed in 2003. In 2005, it was severely damaged by Hurricane Katrina. After a $5 million restoration, the theatre reopened in 2011 as a live performance venue. The marquee and sign were unsalvageable but were faithfully recreated. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

Prytania Theatre
New Orleans, LA
The Prytania Theatre was built in 1927. The facade was remodeled sometime in the 1970s. For more, see this website. [map]

Fiske Theatre
Oak Grove, LA
The Fiske Theatre opened in 1928. The current facade was designed by B.W. Stevens and added in 1950. In 1987, the theatre was donated to the Chamber of Commerce. At that point, it was used for gospel concerts and community events. In 2008, the theatre began showing movies again. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

Joy Theatre
Rayville, LA
The Joy Theatre opened in the 1920s. In the 1930s, it was known as the Richmond Theatre and the Shea Theatre. In 1933, Joy Houck Sr. purchased the theatre and named it after himself. The theatre operated until at least 1972. It has been vacant for many years. For more, see this website. [map]

Dixie Theatre
Ruston, LA
The Dixie Theatre opened as the New Astor Theater in 1928. It featured vaudeville acts and silent films. In 1932, the theatre was sold and renamed the Rialto Theatre. The theatre was remodeled in 1956. At that time, the neon star was added to the marquee. The rays of the star pulsate on and off. There was further remodeling in 1968, including moving the box office inside the building. The theatre closed in 1976. In 2004, restoration work began and the theatre reopened in 2006 as the Dixie Center for the Arts. For more, see this website. [map]

Capri Theatre
Shreveport, LA
The Capri Theatre was built in 1911 as the Saenger Theatre. It was renamed the Capri in 1967 and converted into a nightclub. In 2012, it was returned to use as a movie theatre and event space. The tower above the marquee originally had glass panes. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

Strand Theatre
Shreveport, LA
The Strand Theatre was built from 1923-1925 as the flagship of the Saenger Brothers chain. It originally showed films but is now used as a performing arts center. The original sign is on display at Neonopolis in Las Vegas, NV. This theatre still has its original Morton organ. Major renovation work was done in the 1970s and the theatre reopened in the 1980s. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, and 4. [map]

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