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The Neon Museum (page 2)

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Neon Museum signs
Las Vegas, NV

These signs are owned by The Neon Museum. They were on display near the Fremont Street Experience when these photos were taken in 2006. The signs were moved to storage for several years. In 2018, the Andy Anderson, Red Barn, Chief Hotel Court, and some of the other signs were put on display at the Museum.

The Hacienda Hotel & Casino sign was built in 1967 by YESCO. The Hacienda was demolished in 1996 for the Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino. The Hacienda sign was the first installation at the Neon Museum. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, and 4.

The Andy Anderson sign was built by YESCO and installed on top of the new Anderson Dairy headquarters building in 1956. The sign may have been designed by Hermon Boernge. Andy was used in advertising until 1994. The sign was taken down in the late 1990s and restored by the Neon Museum. The sign was covered with plastic for protection and put on display near Fremont Street in 1997. The sign was removed around 2012 and put in storage. The sign is now on display at the Neon Museum. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, and 3.

The Red Barn was established as an antiques store in 1958. In the early 1960s, the store was converted into a bar and this sign was built by YESCO. The bar closed in 1988. When the bar was destroyed by fire, the sign was saved. It was restored and put on display here in 2000. These photos are from 2006. The sign was later moved into storage. In 2017, the sign was temporarily installed on Las Vegas Blvd. The location will feature rotating displays of signs from the museum's collection. This sign is now on display at the Neon Museum.

The Flame restaurant opened in 1961. It had a Western theme and was located directly across from the Silver Slipper. The restaurant's two, very similar signs were built by YESCO. The flames were rapidly lit in sequence from the center to the outside edge with white, blue, red, and pink neon. Sometime after 1970, the corrugated plastic text panels beneath the flames on both signs were changed. The pole sign in the parking lot originally read "Steaks" and the rooftop sign read "Entrance." The restaurant closed in 1993. The signs were removed just before the building was demolished and put in temporary storage at YESCO. Soon after that, The Neon Museum acquired the rooftop sign and the bottom part of the pole sign with its arrow. It is not known what happened to the pole sign's upper flame and plastic panels. In 1997, the museum restored the rooftop sign which is the smaller of the two. It is about 17 feet tall while the larger sign was about 25 feet tall. The rooftop sign was displayed at the Fremont Street Experience until 2013 when it was moved into storage. In 2019, the sign went back on display at the museum. It is lit and animated during daytime and evening tours. The larger sign's unrestored panel is also on display. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2.

The Chief Hotel Court sign was installed at the hotel around 1940. The text originally read Chief Autel Court. Autel was a popular name for auto hotel/motel at the time. The sign was restored and installed near the Fremont Experience in 1997. It then went into storage for several years. It is now on display at the Neon Museum. For more, see this website.

The Nevada Motel opened in 1937. This sign is from around 1950. This was the first sign to depict the Vegas Vic character. The sign was restored and put on display near the Fremont Experience in 2000. After being in storage for several years, it is now on display at the Neon Museum. For more, see this website.

The Dot's Flowers sign was built by YESCO around 1949. It was restored and put on display here in 2000. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2.

The Aladdin Hotel opened in 1966. The YESCO-designed sign featured Aladdin's Lamp at the top. The sign was updated in the 1980s with a rectangular one that incorporated the Lamp in its design. The hotel closed in 1997 and was demolished in 1998. The Lamp was saved, restored and put on display here in 1997. A new Aladdin Hotel opened in 2000. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, 3, and 4.

The Wedding sign was built in the mid-1940s by YESCO. It was restored and installed here in 2000. Las Vegas has been famous for quickie weddings since the late 1930s.

[daytime photos of Andy, Red Barn, Flame, Chief, Nevada Motel, Dot's, and the Wedding sign thanks Glenda Campbell]

signs in storage [gone]
Las Vegas, NV
These signs in storage belong to The Neon Museum. They were located near Cashman Center. In 2017, these signs were moved to a storage lot just south of the Museum. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2.

The Neon Museum
page 1
Neonopolis Las Vegas Reno Nevada

Main Signs Page

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