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Scaffold Signs (page 4)

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Kentile
Floors [gone]
Chicago, IL
This Kentile Floors sign appeared to be identical to the one in Brooklyn, NY. Both signs were built sometime between 1949 and 1954. The Brooklyn sign was most likely the first since the company was founded there in 1898. I don't know of any other signs built like these. In 1992, Kentile declared bankruptcy from lawsuits over the asbestos contained in their tiles. Neither sign was operational for many years. The Chicago sign was removed in 2013. The owner was concerned about the sign falling apart. He kept the letter "K". The rest of the sign was scrapped. In 2014, the Brooklyn sign was also removed.

Timmerman's Supper Club & Motor Inn [gone]
East Dubuque, IL
Pepsi
Quincy, IL
The Timmerman's Supper Club & Motor Inn were going by two different names in 2010 when this photo was taken: the Timmerman's Hotel & Resort and the Timmerman's Supper Club. The Supper Club was built in 1961 and the Motor Inn in 1974. There were two of these signs, facing different directions. By 2015, both signs had been modernized with backlit plastic letters. By then, the hotel had closed and the "Motor Inn" letters were removed. For more, see this website.

This Pepsi sign is from the early 1960s when the Pepsi bottling plant below it was built. The production has moved to a new location but Pepsi continues to use this building for distribution and warehousing. The sign was refurbished in 2002. For more, see this website. [map]

More Illinois Scaffold Signs:
Millers First Insurance Company (Alton) [gone]
Hoyne Savings Bank (Chicago)
Essex Inn (Chicago)
Pepsi (Chicago) [vintage; gone]
Hotel Pere Marquette (Peoria)
Turk Furniture (Kankakee)

Martinsville City of Mineral Water
Martinsville, IN
The Martinsville City of Mineral Water sign was built around 1930. It was paid for with public donations. At that time, the city was a health resort featuring mineral baths. The sign was restored in 2001. It was restored again in 2017 with LED bulbs. For more, see this website. [map]

Wrecks Inc.
Whitestown, IN
Wrecks Inc., an auto salvage business, went out of business around 2004. These photos are from 2010. The billboard sign shown on the left is gone now. The neon sign was built in 1958 and it is still there although it is no longer lit. Originally, there were older wrecked cars installed on the posts in front of the sign. These photos are from 2010. By 2015, the wrecked cars were gone. In 2018, it was announced that the property would be turned into the Maurer Commons. The sign will be restored an incorporated into the project. [map]

More Indiana Scaffold Signs:
General Electric (Fort Wayne) [gone]
Perfection Bakeries (Fort Wayne)
Walker Theatre (Indianapolis)
Colgate Clock (Jeffersonville)

Hotel Jayhawk
Topeka, KS
The Hotel Jayhawk was built in 1926. The original rooftop sign did not feature a jayhawk. It was a simple text sign on rectangular shaped scaffolding. It was most likely a bulb sign. The two, identical neon signs which exist today were installed on the roof by 1935. One faces the south, the other faces east. The signs are 35 feet tall. The hotel closed in the mid-1970s. In 1982, the building was renamed the Jayhawk Tower and converted into office space. At that point, the signs' letters were changed from "Hotel" to "Tower". The signs were restored in 1999. They were repainted again in 2010. A Jayhawk is a mythical bird which is part blue jay and part sparrow hawk. The bird has been associated with Kansas since the 1850s and became the mascot for Kansas University's football team in 1890. The bird was first depicted in a KU newspaper in 1912. The Jayhawk logo has changed many times over the years. The version which appears on the Jayhawk Tower signs was used from 1923-1929. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

More Kansas Scaffold Signs:
Osage Apartments (Arkansas City)
Sunshine Biscuits (Kansas City) [gone]

Derrick Truck Stop
Greenwood, LA
Lamp Lighter Lounge
Metairie, LA
Falstaff Brewery
New Orleans, LA
This Derrick Truck Stop sign is probably from the 1950s. The neon is now missing from the channel letters. [map]

The huge rooftop Lamp Lighter Lounge sign survived Hurricane Katrina. For more, see this website. [map]

The former Falstaff Brewery features a 185 foot tall sign tower. It was built in 1952 and operated as a weather beacon until the brewery closed in the 1970s. The building remained vacant until 2007 when conversion into apartments began. These photos are from 2010. In 2011, the weather-forecasting sign was restored. The tower and weather ball are lit in the same weather-predicting color patterns as they were originally. The Falstaff letters indicate changing temperatures. When they are lit from bottom to top, it means temperatures are rising. When lit from top to bottom, it indicates temperatures are falling. When the letters flash, there is no change expected. The 11 foot tall steel letters were replicated to conform with local regulations. The requirements included that the sign would need to withstand 130 mile per hour winds.

The sign's weather ball was also refurbished. It provides further weather information. Green, red, and white neon are used to predict rain, showers, approaching storms, cloudy or fair weather. Weather beacons and weather balls were particularly popular in the 1950s and 1960s. Dozens of them were built in the U.S. and other countries. Two weather balls from this time period are still operating in Flint and Grand Rapids, MI. The Falstaff Brewery Building also has a Gambrinus statue on the roof. For more, see these websites: 1, 2, and 3. [map]

More Louisiana Scaffold Signs:
Kean's (Baton Rouge) [gone]
Hotel Monteleone (New Orleans)

Shell
Cambridge, MA
Teddie Peanut Butter
Everett, MA
This Shell sign was constructed in 1933 by the Donnelly Electric Manufacturing Company. It was originally installed with a twin sign on top of the company's headquarters building in Boston. Around 1948, this sign was moved to this location while the other sign was dismantled. It is 68 feet tall and featured animated neon. The sign is still located at an operating Shell gas station. In 2011, just weeks after these photos were taken, a replica sign using LED lighting was installed. It cost more than $200,000 to produce it. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

The Leavitt Corporation began producing Teddie Peanut Butter in Boston, MA in the 1930s during the Great Depression. "Teddie" was the name of one of the manager's sons. When the company moved to Everett in 1960, this sign was built and installed on the building's roof. It is about 70 feet long. Locals recall that the sign's neon text flashed on and off sequentially and that the bear may have had neon as well. The neon stopped working by the late 1960s and the sign has been lit with floodlights since then. Originally, the bear most likely had blue eyes and held a slice of bread in his left hand. He was depicted as such and in the same pose in 1950s advertising and product labels. The sign is repainted as needed. For more, see this website. [map]

Big Bunny Market
Southbridge, MA

The Big Bunny Market sign is installed on the roof above the store's entrance. According to the store's management, it was built in 1962. The eight foot tall bunny statue was added soon after that. There were two of them at this store and another at the Stafford Springs store. The Stafford Springs bunny was stolen. The second one at Southbridge was removed for repairs and never went back up. It was loaned to a salesman who changed the statue into a penguin for a frozen foods promotion. The statue was never returned as promised. The bunny that remains was stolen by a fraternity around 1997. It was located and retrieved.

According to another source, the bunny statue was actually built and installed in 1958. The sign was already there on the store's roof but the letters were different. There were no letters spelling "Market" and there was a round panel with a Bugs Bunny look-alike. [map]

More Massachusetts Scaffold Signs:
Swift Cleaners (Greenfield) [gone]
Lowell Sun (Lowell)

Domino Sugars
Baltimore, MD
Goetze's Meats
Baltimore, MD
The Domino Sugars sign is 120 feet wide. The company claims that the sign is the largest neon sign east of the Mississippi River. The sign was built in 1951. The sign has 650 neon tubes and is lit with solar panels. The plant is still in operation. For more, see these websites: 1 and 2. [map]

The Goetze's Meats double-sided sign remains on the roof of the former Goetze meat packing warehouse. [map]

More Maryland Scaffold Signs:
Home Mutual Life (Baltimore)

McNally's Shoes
Allen Park, MI
Harbortown
Cafe
Benton Harbor, MI
House of Ludington
Escanaba, MI
McNally's Shoes opened in 1945 and is still in business. [map]

The Harbortown Cafe looked like a new restaurant when this photo was taken in 2011. From the size of the letters and the vertical format, it looks like this "Food" sign probably came from a truck stop. The cafe has closed by 2015 but the sign was still there. [map]

The House of Ludington hotel has been around since the late 1800s. This sign has been here since at least the 1940s. [map]

Bean Bunny
Saginaw, MI
The Bean Bunny neon sign was built in 1947. It is 35 feet tall, 50 feet wide, with 12 foot tall letters. The sign is mounted on the Klein-Berger grain elevator. The giant pink jackrabbit was the symbol of the Michigan Bean Company's Jack Rabbit Beans. The sign went dark since 1985 but was relit in 1997. In 2006, the building was sold but the new owner allowed the sign to stay. [map]

More Michigan Scaffold Signs:
Hotel Doherty (Clare)
Ambassador Bridge (Detroit)
Hostess Cake (Detroit) [gone]
Hotel Yorba (Detroit)
Music Hall (Detroit)
Peninsular Paper Co. (Ypsilanti)

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